"Captain Fogg, you've got something of the Yankee about you."

And, having paid his passenger what he considered a high compliment, he was going away, when Mr. Fogg said, "The vessel now belongs to me?"

"Certainly, from the keel to the truck of the masts—all the wood, that is."

"Very well. Have the interior seats, bunks, and frames pulled down, and burn them."

It was necessary to have dry wood to keep the steam up to the adequate pressure, and on that day the poop, cabins, bunks, and the spare deck were sacrificed. On the next day, the 19th of December, the masts, rafts, and spars were burned; the crew worked lustily, keeping up the fires. Passepartout hewed, cut, and sawed away with all his might. There was a perfect rage for demolition.



"The Scarlet Death," Edwin corrected.

"An' don't work all that funny lingo on us," Hare-Lip went on. "Talk sensible, Granser, like a Santa Rosan ought to talk. Other Santa Rosans don't talk like you."

The old man showed pleasure in being thus called upon. He cleared his throat and began.

"Twenty or thirty years ago my story was in great demand. But in these days nobody seems interested—"

"There you go!" Hare-Lip cried hotly. "Cut out the funny stuff and talk sensible. What's interested? You talk like a baby that don't know how."

"Let him alone," Edwin urged, "or he'll get mad and won't talk at all. Skip the funny places. We'll catch on to some of what he tells us."

"Let her go, Granser," Hoo-Hoo encouraged; for the old man was already maundering about the disrespect for elders and the reversion to cruelty of all humans that fell from high culture to primitive conditions.

The tale began.

"There were very many people in the world in those days. San Francisco alone held four millions—"

"What is millions?" Edwin interrupted.



"It's a mystery," replied the Lion. "I suppose I was born that way. All the other animals in the forest naturally expect me to be brave, for the Lion is everywhere thought to be the King of Beasts. I learned that if I roared very loudly every living thing was frightened and got out of my way. Whenever I've met a man I've been awfully scared; but I just roared at him, and he has always run away as fast as he could go. If the elephants and the tigers and the bears had ever tried to fight me, I should have run myself--I'm such a coward; but just as soon as they hear me roar they all try to get away from me, and of course I let them go."

"But that isn't right. The King of Beasts shouldn't be a coward," said the Scarecrow.

"I know it," returned the Lion, wiping a tear from his eye with the tip of his tail. "It is my great sorrow, and makes my life very unhappy. But whenever there is danger, my heart begins to beat fast."

"Perhaps you have heart disease," said the Tin Woodman.

"It may be," said the Lion.

"If you have," continued the Tin Woodman, "you ought to be glad, for it proves you have a heart. For my part, I have no heart; so I cannot have heart disease."

"Perhaps," said the Lion thoughtfully, "if I had no heart I should not be a coward."

"Have you brains?" asked the Scarecrow.

"I suppose so. I've never looked to see," replied the Lion.

"I am going to the Great Oz to ask him to give me some," remarked the Scarecrow, "for my head is stuffed with straw."



'One, indeed!' said the Dormouse indignantly. However, he consented to go on. 'And so these three little sisters—they were learning to draw, you know—'

'What did they draw?' said Alice, quite forgetting her promise.

'Treacle,' said the Dormouse, without considering at all this time.

'I want a clean cup,' interrupted the Hatter: 'let's all move one place on.'

He moved on as he spoke, and the Dormouse followed him: the March Hare moved into the Dormouse's place, and Alice rather unwillingly took the place of the March Hare. The Hatter was the only one who got any advantage from the change: and Alice was a good deal worse off than before, as the March Hare had just upset the milk-jug into his plate.

Book Thief

bookIn principio erat Verbum, et Verbum erat apud Deum, et Deus erat Verbum.
Erat in principio apud Deum .Omnia per ipsum facta sunt et sine ipso factum est nihil quod factum est .In ipso vita erat , et vita erat lux hominum. Et lux in tenebris lucet , et tenebrae eam non comprehenderunt. Fuit homo missus a Deo cui nomen erat Joannes. Hic venit in testimonium ut testimonium perhiberet de lumine , ut omnes crederent per illum . Non erat ille lux, sed ut testimonium perhiberet de lumine. Erat lux vera quae inluminat omnem hominem venientem in hunc mundum.
In mundo erat , et mundus per ipsum factus est , et mundus eum non cognovit. Quod sua venit , et sui eum non receperunt .
Quotquot autem receperunt eum , qui credunt in nomine eius dedit potestatem filios Deinati non ex sanguinibus neque ex voluntate carnis neque ex voluntate viri , sed ex Deo nati sunt . Verbum caro factum est et habitavit in nobis. Et vidimus gloriam ejus, gloriam quasi unigeniti , qui a Patre , plenum gratiae et veritatis. ( Joannes testimonium perhibet de ipso. Et clamavit, dicens, " Hic est , de quo locutus sum et dixi : Qui post me venturus est , ante me factus est quia prior me erat ". ) De plenitudine eius nos omnes accepimus et gratiam pro gratia iam dicta. Quia lex per Moysen data est, gratia et veritas per Iesum Christum facta est. Deum nemo vidit unquam , nisi unigenitus Filius , qui est infimus in ordine ad Deum, et Patris, ipse enarravit.
Hoc est testimonium Joannis, quando miserunt Iudaei ab Hierosolymis sacerdotes et Levitas ad eum ut interrogarent eum: Tu quis . Non negavit et confessus est , libere confiteri "Ego non sum Christus ." Interrogaverunt eum: " Quis enim es tu? Elias es tu? " At ille: " Non sum. " " Propheta es tu ?" Ipse autem respondens ait : "Non" Tandem dicebant, " Quis es ut responsum demus his qui miserunt nos ad vos revertetur . Quid dicis de teipso? " Respondit Joannes in libro sermonum Isaiae prophetae : "Ego sum vox clamantis in deserto dirigite viam Domini . " Qui missi erant Pharisæi